Dec 072013
 

Raine Maida Montreal BTS from Jon Blacker

Having worked with his management company while making portraits of a couple of the members of Finger Eleven (James Black and Rich Beddoe) for my Musical Ink book, in February of this year I had the great opportunity to work with Our Lady Peace singer Raine Maida on the set of the shooting of a music video for his new single Montreal.

We arranged to work together to shoot a full day behind the scenes project with Raine consisting of stills and time-lapse segments while they shot the music video.

The day started early with me arriving at 7:00am before the crew started loading gear into the venue; Victoria College at the University of Toronto.

First on my hit list was setting up the time-lapse camera. I was using three Nikon D600 bodies for this project and dedicated one of them to shoot one frame every 10 seconds to capture the entire day from load-in to load-out and include several segments into the final piece. Of course there was no power at the back of the room where I set up the time-lapse body with an AC adapter (it was going to be a long day and running on batteries was simply not an option). Fortunately I brought a 100’ extension cord and plugged in next to the stage then taped the cord to the floor all the way back to the tripod; the LAST thing you ever want to happen is have someone trip over your extension cord! I set the interval to fire every 10 seconds and dialed the exposure in to ISO 800, f/5.6 and Aperture Priority; during the course of the day, the lighting was going to be all over the place, and I was not going to be able to constantly make adjustments.

With the time-lapse up and running, I was able to step back and slow down a little, shooting the room as the crew wheeled in road case upon road case and started setting up the show. Everyone had their task and this crew really worked well together to put this set up. I did my thing while they were doing theirs; shooting the entire production as some were setting up lighting while others set up instruments while others still were running cable upon cable from amps & microphones to the mixing board.

Once the stage was set, Raine and the band took their positions and pixels started rolling (the entire music video was shot using Nikon D800 bodies and Nikkor lenses – a deal that I arranged between the production company and Nikon Canada). I had free reign to be anywhere I wished during shooting (provided I wasn’t in their shots of course) to make the images I wanted, providing me many unique angles as they played Montreal live over and over…and over again. It was when the smoke machine started up that the truest technical challenge of the day presented itself. The contrast fell out of the light almost completely. Focusing was tough at times when the smoke was at its thickest and the color temperature of the lighting changed dramatically.

In the end, after filming was completed, both with and without a live audience, I felt I came away with same really great images that would tell the story of the day, from empty room to empty room.
My decision to convert my entire piece to black and white stemmed primarily from an aesthetic perspective; I felt it not only paired well with the song, but it gave a gritty feel to my images, a peek back stage through a dirty window, that I think would have largely been lost in color.

At the end of the day, this was a great project to shoot, allowing me to show the entire process of a video shooting day from start to finish. It also sparked an idea that I have since pithed to a number of bands on tour; A Day on the Road With…

A Day on the Road With is not unlike what I’ve shown here with Raine Maida; full day coverage of every move the band makes from the time the tour bus shows up until they’re back on the road to the next show. I’m talking with a couple of bands already; stay tuned.

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